New Consumerism

These are your ten commandments for the new consumerism. What’s the new consumerism, you might ask? Well, it’s this:

For decades, a brand’s only priority was to create the best possible product at the most competitive price to ensure sales. But as consumers develop a more comprehensive understanding of issues like sustainability, authenticity and transparency, brands and retailers are being forced to change the way they sell in order to survive.

This change in consumers’ attitudes has a term — “new consumerism” — coined by research firm Euromonitor. “[Its] about today’s consumers reassessing their priorities and increasingly asking themselves what they truly value,” says Sarah Boumphrey, Euromonitor’s global lead of economies and consumers. “[And] conscious consumption replacing the conspicuous consumption of yesteryear.”

So basically, forget good products at low prices, consciousness is now a consumer product. Sweet and tasty. Very good. We sell bespoke experience wholesale.

bee-head

I don’t know why I do this to myself. Really, this is just your standard marketing-speak, handed not down from on high on stone tablets but at conferences on business cards and spread through a thousand speaking engagements worldwide. But then I remember:

I fucking love the throwaway lines in things like this. If you like your dystopian hellscapes rendered in the most banal language possible, well, take a look at this:

“As life becomes a paid-for experience, people increasingly question what is real and what is not.”

 

That’s probably a bit more insightful than the author intended. Here, we find the roots of The Hallucination Regime. Philip K. Dick could take that quote and use it as a tagline.

“Time has become a luxury in today’s connected world.”

Odd isn’t it? If you were to change “today” to “tomorrow” –  “Time has become a luxury in tomorrow’s connected world” – people would be like – that sounds horrible! A world gone mad! Don’t do that! But, as it is, it’s just business as usual. It’s a shrug.

And these relationships with brands? Don’t even get me started.

 

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