log: arrrrrrgh

벌레 일지 WORMDATE: PHASE 1 LEVEL 4

7,630-733,902: 431(+/-??): 11-6,540(0.89%): 85.4 %–49.2 %

OMICRON is starting to get a grip and will probably make up the majority of cases by next week. As a result, the daily case numbers are spiking. And there’s going to be some wide ranging changes to the containment strategy. I’m not totally sure what these will be.

I haven’t been paying much attention.

I’m very head down in my schoolwork. These two research apprenticeships are time consuming. Learning to code is interesting but it takes a lot of time. It’s incredibly slow going. Finding the research, consulting the codebook, all of that sort of thing — it just takes me a lot of fucking time. Plus, I tend to overdo it. The first week of this — well, it’s the first time I’ve ever handed in any incomplete work, let alone handed it in late. On the bright side, I’ve learned more about Bulgaria than I ever intended to. And, this week, I’m moving a lot faster than I was last week. Some of that is understanding what “good enough” means and some of it is seeing what my seniors were comfortable handing in.

But I’ve had no time for much of anything else. No walks or anything. It’s a bit of a drag.

I did get my new glasses though. I like them. They work a lot better.

We also had an earthquake the other night. A 6.4 in Japan. And that’s about what it felt like. I was sitting on the couch when the shaking started. There was a lot of rattling and the leaves on my plant were swaying. The scary thing and what made it feel like a 6 to me was the duration. It was similar to the big one in LA. It went on too long and it just had some substance, you know? Some strength. If you had of asked me what it felt like, I would have said a 6 but at distance. So thanks Cali, for giving me that sense.

After, I had my usual quake brain. It feels a bit like dizziness or lightheadedness laced with a sense of irreality. I also get some nerves. One always worries about aftershocks or whether the quake was a foreshock. Waiting for next. But there’s nothing you can even really do about it. It’s not like you can run from the fucking dirt. So, you know, you just hit refresh, try to find some information about what’s happening, and see if other people felt it. They did.

Then, about a couple hours after the earthquake, at 3AM, had a meeting with one of my research groups. I like this particular group a lot. We’re helping a PhD student. Including her, there’s only three of us. My other group has been around for years, is large, and is currently splitting into smaller teams. That group feels like a well-oiled and incredibly bureaucratic machine. This small one feels more like a ragtag bunch of researchers. I like it.

And in both groups, I’m learning some interesting new to me methodologies. Even though I’m just an apprentice, it feels nice to do some science. And say what you want about ASU –god knows, so many do– it is a top research university, especially in anthropology.

Overall, I’m hoping that by the end of this week — maybe next– I will have settled into a bit more of a routine for this semester.

Of course, another thing that might happen is, I might open my research file, find that FOR SOME FUCKING REASON it didn’t save properly, and I lost all my citations, and, instead of doing the last line and being done, spend the last four hours, going through my browser history trying to find the articles I used to back up the Y or N. And not done yet.

Shoot me.

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