Organizing During COVID

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez has helped create some workshops. I had a look at one:

That’s “Working During COVID: Organizing Your Workplace for Safety” about which she says:

COVID-19 is not over. From the lack of paid sick leave to asking workers to reuse PPE, workplaces have not put in strong enough safety protections. That’s why we’re doing this workshop. We’ll teach you your labor rights and how you can reach out to your co-workers, organize your demands, and win safety protections.

It’s a pretty good video. Ocasio-Cortez isn’t actually in it, preferring to let labor organizers do the talking, and they give a pretty good overview on how to do some of this important work, while providing some resources to help you do it. And this work is important. No matter who wins the election, this stuff needs to be done. American workers need organization.

Now, that word –“organizing”– makes it all sound a lot more complicated and abstract than any of it really is. You could be forgiven for wondering “what does ‘organizing’ even mean?” let alone being a bit lost on how to get started and what to do. But it’s all pretty simple.

Really, most of organizing is just having conversations with your co-workers, listening to their concerns, then simply figuring out a way to act together to change the situation. If you’re going to organize, you really have to listen. If you start having these conversations with your co-workers and you listen, the issues to organize around will rapidly reveal themselves. Those issues will suggest solutions. As you get more organized, the routes from conversations to actions get shorter. Your workplaces gets better at it.

Like, fuck’s sake, on a job, most the time everyone knows what’s wrong and what has to be done to fix it — we just have a hard time figuring out how to make that happen. Organizing let’s people know that they’re not alone. (In my workplace, every department was going through the same shit but all thinking it was limited to them.) And it lets people know that something can be done about it. Then you figure out what to do and you do it. Together.

And then you keep doing it until you get your result.

That’s pretty much all there is to it.

That’s not to say it’s easy or safe. There’s resistance and danger almost every step of the way. And it can be exhausting. But it’s not complicated. Most of it is legwork. Believe me, if you can manage to do a job, you can organize a workplace. It’s probably easier to do than your job. You don’t need to be some great strategist (there’s pretty much a step by step to the actions) or some grand, inspirational firebrand. You don’t need to be a hero. You just need to put in some time, listen, and do the boring work. You do that, the excitement will come. Whether you want it to or not, the excitement will come. Ups and downs.

One thing that I think is really important, which this video doesn’t really touch on, is the importance of your word. Your word is bond. Don’t make crazy promises. If you don’t know something, just say that you don’t know. If you say you’re going to do something or look into something, do that. Make sure you do what you say. All of the time. Every time. If you can’t do something, say so. Better that than lying. And communicate. Even the bad news. You have to be open and honest. Organizing runs on trust. Trust is earned. Honesty earns it.

If you’re in a situation where you can do this work, do it. It can be pretty damn tiring and difficult but it’s necessary and not all that complicated. It’s just work. You can do it. And you won’t need to do it by yourself for very long. People will help. People want to help.

You can do it.

Them and Us Unionism

The United Electrical Workers (UE) has published a short pamphlet about a return to class struggle unionism. It’s pretty good stuff and well worth a read. You can read it here.

For the past several decades labor leaders and academics have proposed a wide variety of strategies to rebuild the U.S. labor movement: from better communications work, to giving more money to politicians, to restructuring of the labor movement and its federations, to investments in staff-driven organizing efforts. But none of it has worked, because none of those strategies recognize that the core issue facing unions, today and throughout history, is the fundamental difference of interests between workers and employers in the capitalist system.

It lines up pretty well with my experience with unions, the problems with them, the reasons for these problems, and what needs to be done to make unions effective.

The labor movement we need must be a militant movement, built from the bottom up, and it must be based on clear-cut principles: aggressive struggle, rank and file control, political independence, international solidarity and uniting all workers — in other words, Them and Us Unionism.

Anyway, go give it a read.

Moat USA

In Lori Lightfoot’s Chicago, Bridges Have Become Barricades:

In a time of crisis, in one of the most racially and economically segregated places in the country, the bridges connecting north and south and linking east and west — sides of town that serve as proxies for wealth versus disinvestment — were made uncrossable, like drawbridges over a castle moat.

So we’re back to moats in the USA, I guess. There’s just something so basically unsettling about seeing quasi-medieval tactics, ethics and power dynamics mixed with modern technologies. That kind of merging and collision of present and past is the effect that a lot of old sci-fi tried to create. The Roman Colosseum but with rollerballs. That sort of thing.

But what it all kind of reminds me of is this line from Randolph Bourne, which I’m not going to look up. (If you don’t know him, his essays are worth a read — and although he was writing during often about WW1, his criticisms of the American intellectual class still hold a lot of weight.) I can’t remember exactly how the line goes but he was thinking about WW1 and the era that preceded it, and how everyone with their new technologies thought they were so cosmopolitan and clever, that they were all going to progress into some great future, and then, as if from ancient history, that old iron head emerged. Seeing this sort of shit always reminds me of that thought. Here’s that old iron head. Still with us.

People’s Budget LA

Just touching base here today in the hope of spreading the word about this People’s Budget. You can read it, get the toolkits and all that, and figure out how to support it here.

The People’s Budget LA is a coalition convened by Black Lives Matter-Los Angeles. The coalition includes community organizations, faith leaders, parents, teachers, students, nonprofit leaders, and individuals from across Los Angeles.

It’s a simple tangible demand to defund the police and fund social services and it can probably be adapted to just about any city in the US. And this needs to happen.

Because this sort of budget proposed by the mayor

is just fucked up. That sort of spending won’t solve crime, mediates all public relationships through a racist security apparatus, and dissolves all public trust. That sort of budget is, itself, police violence.

Read about and support The People’s Budget here.

fight

It’s not a riot or riots. A riot doesn’t span a country. It’s an uprising. It’s been coming. It’s overdue.

Every single attempt at communication, negotiation, or conversation has been rejected and exhausted, and rejected and exhausted again, and rejected and exhausted again. People in power have been told what the problems are, they’ve been given people to speak with, they’ve been asked to help and asked to change, and they’ve been asked politely and through the correct channels, and, at every single step, they’ve ignored all of this, and, at every single fucking step, the people in power have just made things worse. In many cases, they dismantled the very systems of communication and negotiation that might have made change possible. They called the people trying to tell them what was up, the very people trying to protect them from themselves, the people who believed that there might be some legitimacy left in these systems, and some possibility of peaceful change, they called these people “radical”, and ignored, ostracized, or demonized them all.

And, now?

Now I’m supposed to think a burning Nordstroms is as criminal as a cop putting a knee on a neck for over eight minutes? That a stolen pair of shoes is as big an act of theft as a $36 bandaid on a doctor’s bill? That a thrown water bottle is as violent as an ICE raid, drone attacks, or a series of illegal wars fought in distant lands? Or that the people are the violent ones when it’s the cops who bring assault rifles to protests, who murder with immunity, to protect a system that just killed 100,000 Americans through gross negligence?

Damage to property is violence? Fuck that. Vandalism is not violence. And, if it was violence, how come damaging property is not violence when that property is “human capital stock” and it’s the boss doing the damage? Does that damage not matter?

The bosses gave their answer on that. They gave it again. And again.

They know the problems. They were told. They answered cries for help with knees on necks. And now, the reply. It’s a fucking sad thing to see but chaos was let loose on America a long time ago. Cops getting away with murder is chaos. This is the fight to fix it.

The Grumpy Owl Guide for Workers Worried About Pandemic

The Positive

People who work with food and the public already know quite a bit about disease. Many of the measures recommended by the World Health Organization are second nature to food workers. Cleaning hands, cleaning surfaces, avoiding face touching, are status quo practices for food workers. Perhaps, even more important, these workers understand themselves not only as potential victims of viruses but also potential carriers. When you work with food and the public, your worst fear usually isn’t getting sick – it’s making somebody else sick. Spreading rather than catching a disease is our nightmare.

Business as usual.

The Problem

But this powerful and pandemic-appropriate understanding of contagion is often ignored by management and its best practices are often undercut by cost-saving measures.

When cuts are made to staff, when someone is overworked, the first things to suffer are health and safety. People stop cleaning in the way they should be cleaning. It’s difficult, if not impossible, to clean when you have customers waiting. Workers start taking risks. They carry too much weight, move too fast, and maybe leave slippery spots on the floor unattended. These problems are created by starvation wages and a workplace culture that stops people from calling in sick.

When I worked in the meat department of Ralph’s, the store director would often come by to complain that we were using too many gloves. These gloves are single use. They are supposed to changed –according to the store’s own stated policy, the directions on the box, and EVEN THEIR NAME– every single time you’re about to touch a different sort of meat. They should be changed when you move from one task to another. That’s why they’re called “single use gloves.” This what we were told to do but we were only told this on paper. In reality, we were shouted at by our boss for using these gloves. Why? Because the company wanted to save money on supplies.

It was my understanding that management receives bonuses based on the profitability of their stores. The fastest way for them to make money is to save money. The fastest way for them to save money is by cutting hours and reducing the use of supplies. We often did not have enough garage bags to change the garbage in the parking lot. We were not given the equipment –the gloves– we needed to change these bags. After being so badly outfitted by the store, we were then told to return to working with food. This would happen with no easy access to hand-washing facilities and under a lot of pressure to be fast.

The Pattern

I want you to look at this.

DIsgusting right?

This is the equipment we were given to change the fryers and throw out the old grease. We had to scrape that grease out of those buckets using a piece of cardboard ripped from a nearby box. We had no scoop. Then we had to rinse the grease out of those buckets and scrub them clean with paper towels. If any of this grease ended up on the floor, we were warned that this was “a fireable offence.” This store is part of a multi-billion dollar operation. And here we were, scrounging around with pieces of cardboard to clean fryers.

I point this out not to bring attention to this specific practice. (Indeed, by the time I left, the fryer system had finally been updated.) Instead, I want to use this problem to point out a pattern of behavior from management — a pattern that has not been fixed.

Workers are not given the equipment, training or time they need to perform their jobs in a safe or responsible way. We are forced to sign papers where we promise to perform a series of cleaning tasks yet we are sometimes outrightly forbidden from performing these tasks. Most often, these tasks are, de facto, impossible to perform. If we fall short, if a mistake is made, if something bad happens, the company has covered its ass. Neither it nor its cost-saving policies are ever held accountable. The worker is blamed.

With the outbreak of COVID-19, this is an especially worrying pattern but it is a longstanding one. During our union’s last contract negotiations with management, our union, for the first time in its history, brought in some rank and file workers. I was honored to be one of these workers. Our job was to tell these corporate lawyers about problems as we saw them.

One of the workers who was also brought in was sick. She had a cold. I told management”s lawyers that she was there –even though she was sick– because we were all used to working sick. To us, working sick had become normal. I told them that our sick days were theoretical. Our wages were too low. No one could afford to call in. Our jobs were precarious. Many of us could not afford to lose a single shift. We were always on skeleton crews. We were always so understaffed that calling in sick meant that we were letting down our co-workers. None of us wanted to make more work for our fellow workers. We all knew that even one person being sick could be catastrophic for our co-workers and friends. We wanted to do our bit. Not so much for the company but for each other. No one wanted to be sick. Chronic under-staffing had developed a culture at odds with health and safety.

Adding to this, if anyone did call in sick, we always met with opposition from management. Sometimes this was retaliation in the form of threats and cut hours. Although I very rarely took a sick day, having almost perfect attendance and punctuality, I had been personally threatened when I took a sick day and told by the store director that I needed to produce a doctor’s note. (I was not alone — this store director, who won manager of the year or some such thing, always did this. It was his standard practice and it’s not even true. One does not have to produce a note unless they are sick for three days in a row.)

I sat there and I told management’s lawyers that these practices were putting our customers at risk of infection. If we make a customer sick, I warned, we not only hurt the customer but the business. People who get sick from a store do not return to that store. Yet we were being forced to work sick every day. Working sick was expected. Working sick was standard.

Do you want to know what management’s corporate lawyers did about that? Do you want to know their response?

They smiled and they thanked us and they waited for us to leave. Then they demanded that the room be disinfected. That was their response. That was all they did. They decided to ignore the health of their workers and the health of their customers. But they certainly looked after themselves.

So, if any of this gets spread through grocery stores, through Kroger, Vons, Alberston’s or anything under the umbrella of Cerebus, and any of those companies, at any point, claims ignorance about how their policies helped create that mess. If they try to blame an employee, you should know that they knew the risks. I know they know because I told them. Their lawyers took notes. They know the risk. They decided it’s acceptable. For you, that is. For them? Disinfectant if they even briefly share a room with worker.

The Solution

Livable wages, enough hours, workers rights, and adequate staffing are public health issues. And they’re almost as important as healthcare.

But those solutions seem distant. So what can we do, right now? What can you do if you work in a place like this? What can you do if you’re a customer?

There are some things that every food company should be doing right now — some things that they should have started long ago, and a lot of things they should definitely have started doing in the past few weeks. Every store should have a lot of extra staff. There should be a lot of focus on cleaning surfaces. You should all be wearing gloves and you should change these gloves regularly. The main surfaces on the registers should be getting cleaned constantly as should the touch screens at the self-checkouts. At least one person should be constantly working to keep the restrooms clean. And you need extra people to do that. The company needs to supply those people. Furthermore, the company should have a clear plan to support its sick workers.

If you’re a customer, you should contact the managers of these stores and tell them this. Now, they don’t care about you much more than they care about their workers, but they still need to hear this and they need to hear it from you. If they hear it enough, it might help.

We know that these are not changes that any company wants to make. It costs money.

As a worker, you may not have the power you need to make them do it. But, if you have a union, there are steps you can take right now. These steps might help to cover your ass. Delegations can be sent to management asking for these things — more staff, better supplies, and a clear plan to support workers who get sick. If anyone gets sick at one of these stores, we already know who the bosses will try to blame. They will try to blame you.

Don’t make that easy for them. Get your concerns on the record and do it quickly.

And do you need help with making a delegation? Labor Notes is a great place to get advice and, for the quick and dirty version, there’s The Grumpy Owl Guide to Making a Delegation to the Boss. I wish you all luck.

One Last Thing

We all have relationships with our customers. Quite often, people find out about community news through us. We’re not only vectors for disease but also for information.

As such, food and service workers have a special duty here. We have to resist scapegoating, racism, and xenophobia. None of these things help. Scapegoating is particularly bad. What happens is one group gets blamed, they shift blame onto another group, and so on and so forth. It’s never-ending.

Scapegoating does nothing to help anyone and it hurts a lot of people. Remember that tomorrow you will have to face the people you pointed the finger at today. You don’t need to be a hero but you need to remain decent. You want to get through this with your self-respect.

I hope that the knowledge and experience you all have –the deep understanding of yourself not only as possible victims of disease but also as potential carriers of disease– is reflected by an understanding of yourselves as carriers of information and misinformation. Be responsible with your words. Stick to what you know. When you hear people blaming an ethnic or racial group for this virus, you need to resist that bullshit. Raise your voice. Object.

Don’t spread rumors. Don’t panic. Don’t make people any more afraid than they already are! Stick to the basics of what you can do. Hygiene!

We’re all in this together and we can only get through it together.

American Detention Machine

“Maybe it is a concentration camp; I don’t want to make it look nice.” Joe Arpaio stands by his 2008 description of his infamous “tent city” jail. The former Arizona sheriff cultivates an image of toughness on immigration. In 2016, Donald Trump welcomed Arpaio’s support, saying, “When Sheriff Arpaio gives you an endorsement, you know you’re the king of the border.” Rewarding Arpaio with a presidential pardon in 2017 after the sheriff defied a judge’s order to stop immigration arrests, Trump sent a clear message that the handcuffs were off Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents.